About This Project

The Queen Anne style in Britain refers to either the English Baroque architectural style approximately of the reign of Queen Anne (reigned 1702–1714), or a revived form that was popular in the last quarter of the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century (when it is also known as Queen Anne revival).[1] In British architecture the term is mostly used of domestic buildings up to the size of a manor house, and usually designed elegantly but simply by local builders or architects, rather than the grand palaces of noble magnates.

The well-known architectural commentator and author Marcus Binney, writing in The Times in 2006, describes Poulton House built in 1706, during the reign of Queen Anne, as “…Queen Anne at its most delightful”. Binney lists what he describes as the typical features of the style:[2]

  • A sweep of steps leading to a carved stone door-case
  • Rows of painted sash windows in boxes set flush with the brickwork
  • Stone quoins emphasizing corners
  • A central triangular pediment set against a hipped roof with dormers
  • Typically box-like “double pile” plans, two rooms deep

When used of revived “Queen Anne style” of the 19th and 20th century the historic reference in the name should not be taken too literally, as buildings in the Queen Anne style often bear as little resemblance to English buildings of the 18th century as those of any revival style to the original. Furthermore, the Queen Anne style in other parts of the English-speaking world, particularly in the United States and Australia, is significantly different from that in the United Kingdom, and may hardly include any elements typical of the actual architecture of Anne’s reign.

Date

March 15, 2016

Category
Queen Anne Style